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April 12, 2021 2 min read 0 Comments

I was 15 when I lost my house, and reality as I knew it. Hurricane Katrina was a blessing in disguise that echoes transformation. See, when I was 15 I wasn’t in the best place for myself--I was not doing great in school, I was extremely overweight, and I did not have a plan or ambition for what I wanted to do in life. But on August 29, 2005 my family and I turned on the local Texas news to see that our lives would be different.

My uncle came into our hotel room and asked me what I was eating. I explained to him that I was trying to lose weight, and was attempting to exercise, and eat a better diet as I shoveled ramen noodles into my mouth. I always looked up to my uncle so much, so when he explained that he could put me on a diet that would melt my weight away, I was ecstatic. My uncle always seemed to be someone with all the right answers. I looked up to him a lot, so when he told me I would have to eat 6 to 8 times a day I did not question it.

That year I learned discipline in a way I had not understood it before. I lost 82lbs going from 230lbs to 148lbs. When I said that Katrina was a blessing in disguise that echoes transformation, what I mean is that I learned to push my principal of discipline, to expand the muscle of discipline beyond what I knew I could do with it previously. The echo continues, because discipline is something everyone has, but not everyone has reason enough to apply it. Now I understand that purpose is always changing. Back then, I just wanted to not be fat.

Fast-forward to COVID 19-2020 and “having” discipline is not something I need to work on, but having “purpose” in order to apply discipline is evergoing . I’ve developed jumping rope  as a part of the function and purpose that I’d like to represent--someone who doesn’t just lift heavy weights (that gets old quick IMO), but someone whose physique is functional, whose mind is functional, and whose purpose is functional. 

Through my life experience I’ve come to understand careful calculation and strategic planning gives one all the momentum to take action. However taking action in an unfamiliar direction requires courage. My goal for Jump Theory is to help individuals learn to take action with courage in a new direction, to build confidence and courage in order to Jump into their truth: to develop their Jump Theory.


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